Sativa

Sativa strains of cannabis, similar to their Indica cousins, have a wide variety of health benefits. Some of the more notable benefits include

  • Relief from depression
  • Mind stimulation
  • Increasing focus, and
  • Treating PTSD

Examples: Cinex, Haze Wreck, Jack Herer


Sativa plants are found throughout the world. Potent varieties such as Colombian, Panamanian, Mexican, Nigerian, Congolese, Indian and Thai are found in equatorial and sub/equatorial zones. These plants require a long time to mature because they originated in areas that have a long season. They are usually very potent, containing large quantities of THC. The highs they produce are described in such terms as psychedelic, dreamy, spacey, and creative. The buds usually smell sweet or tangy and the smoke is smooth, sometimes deceptively so.

Sativa plants grow in a conical, Christmas-tree form. The leaves have long, narrow serrated blades, wide spacing between branches, and vigorous growth. They often grow very tall outdoors and are difficult to control indoors.

Sativas have long, medium-thick buds when grown in full equatorial sun; under artificial light with inadequate intensity, or even under the temperate sun, the buds run, or are thinner, longer and don’t fill out completely. In areas with short growing seasons, the buds often don’t mature before frost.


Sativa at a Glance

Height: 5′ to 25′ (1.5 to 7.5 m)

Shape: Tall, Christmas-tree shape

Branching: Moderate branching, wide at its base, single stem at top

Nodes: Long stem length between leaves

Leaves: Long leaves, thin long blades

Color: Pale to medium green

Flowers: Long sausage-shaped flowers

Odor: Sweet to spicy

High: Psychedelic

Flowering: 8 to 15 weeks

Indica

Indica strains of cannabis have a multitude of health benefits, which include but are not limited to:

  • Relief from body pain
  • Muscle relaxation
  • Reduction of seizures
  • Migraine relief, and
  • Appetite stimulation

Examples: Afghan Kush, Blue Cheese, Blackberry Kush


Indica plants developed in central Asia between the 25th and 35th latitudes, where the weather is changeable. Drought one year may be followed by cloudy, rainy or sunny weather. For the population to continue, the plant group needed different individuals that survive and even thrive under those specific conditions. Thus, in any season, no matter what the weather, some plants will do better than others.

Indicas, including Kush varieties, have broad general characteristics: they mature early, have compact short branches and wide, short leaves which are dark green, sometimes tinged purple. Their buds are usually tight, heavy, wide, and thick, rather than long. They smell “stinky,” “skunky,” or “pungent,” and their smoke is thick – a small toke can induce coughing.

Indica plants were developed for resin content, which was removed from the flowers to make hashish. It is only after these varieties were introduced to the West that their buds were consumed. The best indicas have a relaxing “social high,” which allow you to sense and feel the environment, without analyzing the experience.


Indica at a Glance

Height: 2′ to 6′ (0.6 to 1.8m)

Shape: Conical to bushy

Branching: Lots of side branching, usually wider than its height

Nodes: Short stem length between leaves

Leaves: Wide short leaves, short wide blades

Color: Dark green to purple

Flowers: Wide, dense, bulky

Odor: Pungent, sticky, or fruity

High: Inertia, desensitizing

Flowering: 6 to 9 weeks

 

Tax and Regulate Cannabis

It’s official: Oregon voters will decide in November whether to regulate, tax and legalize marijuana for adults 21 and over.

The Oregon Secretary of State has certified that our petition campaign has turned in enough valid signatures to qualify the Control, Regulation, and Taxation of Marijuana and Industrial Hemp Act for the November ballot.

We are celebrating today’s achievement by hosting our first voter registration canvass in Pioneer Courthouse Square, led by young Oregonians who will be decisive in winning a new approach to marijuana.

“This is our moment to be part of history and lead a movement,” said Dominic Lopez, metro regional organizer for New Approach Oregon. “Treating marijuana use as a crime has failed, but together we can win a more sensible approach and better the lives of Oregonians.”

Measure 53 is designed to regulate cannabis use for adults age 21 and over in the state of Oregon. It will not dismantle the current medical marijuana system, nor will it prevent Oregonians over 21 from growing their own marijuana plants. The approach prohibits minors from buying, selling, manufacturing, possessing or consuming marijuana. It will remain a felony to sell to minors.

A vital piece of the approach states that marijuana will be taxed to pay for state and local services – namely  law enforcement, education, and health services.