CBD for Pets!

Our friends at Flower Child wrote this great piece on using cannabis to treat your pets. Their CBD Tincture for Pets is available at both Substance locations. Of course, be sure to consult with a trusted veterinarian before giving medical marijuana to your pet.

Marijuana for Pets, Oh My!

Our pets mean the world to us, they fill our lives with happiness and laughter, they are loyal and never judge us, they forgive us and are always happy to see us. We love our pets. We want them to be happy and healthy and it’s awful when they are sick. It hurts us to see our pets suffering.

Cannabis has been used for thousands of years for it’s therapeutic qualities and as it becomes more and more accepted today for it’s medicinal benefits people are realizing that cannabis works wonders not only for humans but for our four legged friends as well. You got it. Medical marijuana for pets!

Some people may call the cannabis movement a trend or a craze, but this herb’s therapeutic properties are science-based fact. Oakland-based veterinarian Dr. Gary Richter tells us cannabis can be used on your pet to treat a variety of medical conditions including:

  • Allergies/ itching
  • Anxiety
  • Arthritis and other causes of pain
  • Appetite support
  • Cancer treatment
  • Cancer pain
  • Glaucoma
  • Inflammatory Bowel Disease
  • Quality of life / Hospice care
  • Seizures

But, we still have a lot to learn about cannabis in general and marijuana for pets is no different.

If you’re considering medical marijuana for pets, here are some important points you want to keep in mind.
And of course, be sure to consult with a trusted veterinarian before giving medical marijuana to your pet.

Pets have endocannabinoid systems, just like us humans

The endocannabinoid system is quickly gaining relevance in modern medicine for both humans and pets.
Just like humans, animals also have endocannabinoid systems (ECS). The ECS has receptors throughout the whole body. It is this system that helps us maintain balance in our body. If we are deficient in cannabinoids our body is out of whack so to speak. We are unbalanced.

Like us, animals produce their own cannabinoids to interact with and signal the ECS. And like us, animals also run into endocannabinoid deficiencies. This is where whole-plant-based cannabis medicine comes into play. Cannabis has cannabinoids which attach to our ECS and create balance and healing for those deficient in cannabinoids. It is almost as if this plant was created specifically to heal and balance our bodies.

Be very careful with dosing marijuana to your pet.

A marijuana overdose is not fatal, but it can be a traumatic experience as a pet owner. The general rule of thumb is this: give the smallest dose possible and gradually work your way up until you find the smallest yet most effective cannabis dosage level for your pet. But knowing exactly what dosage you’re giving your pet can be tricky, Richter says. And because many of the products on the market are highly potent and animals have a smaller body size, we have to be extra careful.

Signs of a pet marijuana overdose.

If your pet does experience a cannabis overdose, don’t let the mishap turn you away from this medicine completely. The therapeutic potential is still there if done properly. Too much THC can be extremely unpleasant, and with pets it’s really easy to overdo it if you’re not careful – or if you don’t know what you’re doing. So what does a pet overdose look like, and how do you know when to make a trip to the emergency clinic?

“A lot of it might be what you expect. The animal will start to look a little bit spacey and get a bit wobbly,” Richter says. “A lot of dogs will develop the syndrome called static ataxia, where basically they’re standing still and start to tip over but catch themselves before they fall.”

If the overdose is substantial enough, the pet’s blood pressure level may not be particularly stable or they won’t eat, Richter says. Even though these overdoses are not fatal they can be an extremely traumatic – not to mention pricey – experience for pets and families. Nobody wants to see their pet in that kind of condition. And the thing with edibles is that the effects can be really long-lasting, 12 hours or longer depending on how much has been consumed. It’s an experience that can turn pet owners away from marijuana for pets completely, even though there is still therapeutic potential if done properly. New research is showing that CBD can counteract the affects of a THC overdose, kind of an antidote.

Should you take your pet to the emergency clinic?

“If the dog is a little wobbly but seems comfortable, I would not necessarily advise a visit to the emergency room. If you are concerned however, it’s best to contact a veterinarian for advice,” Richter says. “If the pet is having a hard time standing and they’re not really responding properly and they’re not eating or drinking, then they probably need to be seen for that.”

Learn the methods of marijuana delivery for your pet.

Deciding which delivery method is best for your pet can take some research. Capsules, treats, tinctures, topicals – just like cannabis medicine for humans, we have a variety of options in delivering marijuana for pets. Richter has seen a lot of pet owners find success with cannabis oils, which they give their pet orally. He has also seen a cannabis topical spray clear up severe skin allergies in dogs, to the point where they stop scratching for 4 to 6 hours.

“Short of loading them up on a steroid like prednisone, nothing does that. This topical is nothing short of amazing,” Richter says.

Yet another method of delivery, although Richter has yet to see it applied to pets, is a cannabis suppository.

Figuring out THC-CBD ratios for pets.

With cannabis there are countless options to form the ultimate combination of strains, cannabinoids, and terpenes. This is an important part of cannabis medicine, especially because the amount of THC, CBD, and other cannabinoids, flavonoids, and terpenes can fluctuate wildly from one strain to another. Dr. Richter has seen success with varying ratios of THC and CBD depending on the condition being treated.

“Sometimes, higher concentrations of THC are more effective provided the product is dosed correctly,” he says. Finding the best ratio of marijuana for pets requires experimenting, trial and error – and of course safe access to products that are accurately and precisely labeled.

“It is always best to seek the advice of an experienced veterinary professional when deciding which product and what dose to use,” Richter says. Richter advises against CBD products where there is little to no THC – such as with a lot of the CBD hemp oils found online. “If you’re looking to treat a dog that maybe has minor soreness, there might be some positive effect with a hemp-based CBD product, but otherwise you’re severely restricting your therapeutic applications,” he says.

“With higher-end therapy for things like cancer, autoimmune disease, seizures, or even severe pain, you want a product that is made from cannabis – not hemp – that has a certain amount of THC in it.” The difference without THC in the mix, Richter says, is like the difference between shooting a bullet and throwing it.

Talk to your veterinarian about marijuana for pets.

Whether you live in a prohibition state or not, it’s okay to talk to your vet about marijuana for pets. The conversation has to start somewhere, and even if your veterinarian knows next to nothing about cannabis – that’ll change if enough people start asking.

“As cannabis becomes more available, you’re going to see people out there who will want to use it with their pets,” Richter says. “It’s going to be really important that somebody is able to provide people with guidance. There’s an opportunity here for education.”

If you are interested in using marijuana for pets, Flower Child recommends…

At FlowerChild CBD we recommend our CBD Tincture for Pets. This tincture has been specially formulated for animals with a very high CBD to THC ratio 25:1. It is a medicinal cannabis CBD not a industrial hemp CBD!

THC is what gets you high. CBD does not. THC is necessary in the blend to work synergistically with the CBD, but huge amounts of THC are not necessary to receive the medical benefits of the cannabis.

Help spread cannabis education by sharing this article with friends and followers. Who knows how many pets we might save.

ABOUT GARY RICHTER

Dr. Gary Richter is the owner and medical director of two award-winning veterinary hospitals in Oakland, California. His facilities, Montclair Veterinary Hospital and Holistic Veterinary Care provide both Western and complementary medicine for patients.

Dr. Richter approaches veterinary medicine with an “eyes open” strategy. He utilizes Western medicine, complementary and alternative care, and new, emerging therapies to achieve the best possible results. By incorporating modalities such as herbal/nutritional therapy, acupuncture, chiropractic, and hyperbaric oxygen with conventional medicine and surgery, Dr. Richter does more than treat disease – he promotes healing and wellness.

“There are many conditions that can only be treated with Western medicine and surgery,” says Dr. Richter. “But clearly Western medicine is not the solution to every problem. It would be a mistake for us to turn our backs on successful treatment options because they are not mainstream or widely accepted. There are many occasions when alternative therapy or a combination of therapies is the best solution. If optimal health and welfare is the goal, every legitimate option should be considered for every patient.”
Article by Green Flower Media – Gregory Frye

Distillate: The cannabis concentrate of the future

distillation | dis·til·la·tion | noun

a: the purification or concentration of a substance, the obtaining of the essence or volatile properties contained in it, or the separation of one substance from another, by such a process.

You may only remember this word from high school chemistry class, but distillation is quickly changing the cannabis industry. Concentrate producers are using innovative distillation techniques to create potent, pure, and clean cannabis distillates that can be dabbed, vaped, eaten, dropped under your tongue… the list goes on.

Where Does A Cannabis Oil Distillate Come From?

Pure, potent cannabis oil distillate does not just appear in the wild. There is a specific scientific process that takes place before users are presented with what may very well be the future of cannabis concentrates. In order to extract THC, terpenes, and other cannabinoids from the cannabis plant a solvent-based (butane, propane, CO2) extraction must be performed first.

The solvent-based extraction removes valuable compounds from the plant itself, however many other compounds remain in the extract. In order to distill down to a more pure form, further refinement is done through the processes of winterization and decarboxylation. Finally, the oil is run through a distillation chamber multiple times to refine the desirable compound (THC or CBD) to its most pure form.

Consuming Cannabis Oil Distillate

As we mentioned above, cannabis distillates have a wide variety of applications that can appeal to just about any type of user. Pure cannabis distillates contain virtually no flavors or aromas, which makes them perfect for practical applications where the cannabis “flavor” is not needed or wanted (think edibles and drinks!). Additionally, these powerful distillates have great medicinal potential because of the small amounts needed to produce strong effects.

With a potential potency of nearly 99%, cannabis oil distillate should not be taken lightly. Check out this simple graph below to get an idea of how potent distillate is compared to flower.

distillate-potency

Final Word

While cannabis distillate may be somewhat new to the concentrate market, this well-developed, scientific extraction technique looks to be the next gold standard for cannabis extraction and refinement. While we still love our BHO, CO2, and PHO dabs… cannabis oil distillate is certainly worth trying if you’re looking for the most pure, clean, and potent concentrate.

Your Endocannabinoid System

My what?  Endocannabinoid System.

It’s OK to talk about it.  We all have one.  We just didn’t know that it existed until the 1980’s. Your endocannabinoid system is a complicated body-wide system that helps promote homeostasis.  Homeostasis is when your body is at rest, not stressed, just chilled out and kicked back and doing what it does. Your endocannabinoid system has complex actions in all of your body’s organs and even in the intersection between cell types, like blood vessels and neurons, so it literally acts as a bridge between your body and mind.

Image from cannabisolis.ca

Cannabinoid receptors are like little locks on the surface of cell membranes. They are present throughout the body and are believed to be more numerous than any other receptor system. Cannabinoids are the substances like keys that unlock or activate these receptors.  Delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol, or THC, is the most psychoactive and certainly the most famous of these substances. Others, such as cannabidiol (CBD) and cannabinol (CBN) have valuable healing properties.

Researchers have, thus far, identified at least two cannabinoid receptors. CB1 receptors are mostly present in nerves, connective tissues, gonads, glands, and organs. CB2 receptors are generally found in the immune system and its associated structures. Many tissues contain both CB1 and CB2 receptors, each linked to a different action.  

 

Whoa, that sounded a lot like science.  In a nutshell, scientific research has proven that our state of consciousness definitely affects our physical state of being and that cannabinoids facilitate the communication between our body systems.  

Maybe the secret to world peace is that everyone really does need to sit down and smoke a fat bowl and chill?  

Cooking with Cannabis – Vegan Stir Fry

Learn how to decarboxylate your cannabis before cooking with it, if you wish to achieve the full psychoactive effect. 

This recipe uses cannabis coconut oil. For directions on making cannabis infused coconut oil, check out this guide.

cannabis banner

Ingredients


 

1 cub cubed pumpkin

1/2 cub cubed Japanese eggplant

1 cup trimmed green beans

1 red pepper deseeded and cubed

1 cup chopped coriander

1 lime

1 tablespoon crushed garlic

1 tablespoon crushed ginger

3 tablespoons gluten free sweet and dark soy sauce

2 tablespoons cannabis coconut oil

Hot sauce to taste

 

Directions


 

1. Steam pumpkin cubes for 4 minutes and reserve

2. Heat oil in a large wok or frying pan and add the eggplant and tofu. Fry till crisp before adding the garlic and ginger and stirring to combine

3. Add the soy sauce along with the pepper and the beans and stir fry until cooked but still crunchy. Add the pumpkin and stir to combine

4. Turn off the heat and squeeze in the juice of half the lime and most of the coriander

5. Garnish with hot sauce, remaining lime wedges and coriander

 

The most important thing to remember is that the vegetables you choose must be fresh. Serve this with some quinoa or wild rice if desired. Dose yourself safely and be sure to have a non-medicated side dish to help you fill up so you don’t eat too much. Clearly labeling leftovers and medicated items is recommended.


For more recipes like this, visit the Stoner’s Cookbook here.

Strain Review – Blue Magoo

Blue Magoo, not to be confused with Blue Goo, is a lovely indica dominant hybrid strain with a rich lineage stretching back to the mid 90s where it was originally cultivated by one of the many great growers of Oregon. The mother of the strain was the ever popular indica Blueberry, which was pollinated by Major League Bud (also known as William’s Wonder F2)

A fusion of berry, fruit, and other floral notes make up the aroma and taste of Blue Magoo, resulting in a palate as colorful as its pastel purple and green buds. A tight bud structure is not uncommon in this strain, with dense and resinous nugs absolutely covered in beautiful frosty trichomes.

trichome

Blue Magoo is a favorite among patients as it combats a variety of symptoms including pain, nausea, insomnia, anxiety, and appetite loss. Many patients have claimed that Blue Magoo is a fast acting pain reliever that does not generally carry with it some of the anxiety-inducing effects that higher THC cannabis strains sometimes have. The lack of paranoid side effects, coupled with the rapid and efficacious symptoms relief and palatable fruity taste, make Blue Magoo a very approachable strain and one that any patient would be pleased to experience. 

Substance is currently carrying this strain on our shelves. It starts at $9 a gram, $31.50 an eighth, $60 a quarter, $110 a half ounce and $220 for a full 28 grams. Testing at 20.15% THC and 0.45% CBD, this flower is lovely and exceptional by all accounts. Stop by and see it for yourself.


To read more about Blue Magoo, check out Leafly’s feature right here.

Marijuana’s Surprising Effects on Athletic Performance

When Olympic snowboarder Ross Rebagliati tested positive for a small amount of marijuana in his blood at the 1998 Japan games, his first-place finish was temporarily called into question.
 
But THC, the main mind-altering chemical in marijuana, wasn’t even included in the International Olympic Committee’s banned-substances list at the time (it is now, but at a much higher level than the one he tested at). Rebagliati was allowed to keep his victory and medal. (He is now in the medical-marijuana business.)
 
Even though it’s on the banned list now, does anyone really think of marijuana as a performance-enhancing drug in the first place?
 
After all, as Robin Williams later joked, “the only way it’s a performance-enhancing drug is if there’s a big f—ing Hershey bar at the end of the run,” right?
 
Maybe not.
A renewed appreciation for nature is also not an uncommon side effect of cannabis use.
It turns out marijuana might actually help some people perform better at certain sports.
 
This may sound crazy. After all, we’re all familiar with the image of the couch-locked, Cheetos-covered stoner.
 
Yet there are people that say training while high has helped them unlock new performance gains.
 
In November, Men’s Journal interviewed elite triathlete Clifford Drusinsky, a Colorado gym owner who also leads training sessions fueled by marijuana edibles.
 
“Marijuana relaxes me and allows me to go into a controlled, meditational place,” Drusinsky told Men’s Journal. “When I get high, I train smarter and focus on form.”

Cannabis Topicals and Dermatology

As we have discussed previously in another post , cannabis topicals are good for a variety of ailments. Some of the salves that we currently have in stock help treat symptoms related to psoriasis, melanoma, arthritis, migraines and symptoms like dry and itchy skin. Cannabis topicals come in several varieties, such as roll-on oils, nourishing salves and ointments, and in some cases even products such as soap and sprays.

Topicals are applied directly to the skin, where they are absorbed and utilized by the body. Even though the cannabinoids are being effectually used in the healing process, cannabis topicals are non-psychoactive as long as they are not orally ingested… which is not a course of action that we recommend. It is also important to avoid using cannabis topicals on new, open and bleeding wounds. They can certainly help your body heal cuts and bruises after they have closed up, however.

cannabis topical salve
Lovely cannabis topical salves from the Medicine Farm.

The anti-inflammatory properties present in a multitude of cannabinoids are remarkable; cannabis topicals are therefore very helpful for folks recovering from injuries and for people who suffer from ailments such as rheumatoid arthritis and lupus. Topicals help reduce the time it takes to heal from injuries, and promote the functionality of joints and reduce nodule formation.

Cannabis topicals essentially combine the effects of antibiotic ointment with the healing effects of a salve to produce lovely products that can even help heal burns, eczema, rashes, fungus, and annoyances like warts and blemishes. The uses of topicals are still being explored, but the overwhelming amount of anecdotal evidence of their efficacy in treating all of the ailments we have listed, and more, is undeniable.

Some healing or relieving effects of topicals

  • anti-inflammatory effects
  • analgesic effects
  • relaxing effects on muscles and other body tissues
  • muciparous decongesting effects
  • regenerative effects on body tissues

There are so many conditions that cannabis topicals can help with, and they might just be able to help you too. Stop by the shop and browse our wide selection of topical salves, balms, sprays, and oils to find something that works for you.

 

The Benefits of Juicing Cannabis

As we all know, there are a wide variety of ways to ingest cannabis. You can find many of these on our page highlighting some of the more common methods of marijuana consumption right here. Recently. there has been a lot of talk about a relatively new method of cannabis ingestion; juicing. Why has it become popularized, and what makes juicing cannabis better than other methods of consumption?

juicing cannabis leaves

Well, the parts of the cannabis plant used in juicing are the fan leaves or the cannabis bud itself. These parts of the plant contain not only over a hundred healing cannabinoids, but also contain photo-nutrients such as chlorophyll and chloroplast, which provide some of the best plant-based energy nutrients. Cannabis is rich in omega-3 and -6 fatty acids, which are essential nutrients that our bodies do not produce independently, so we must find them through the foods we consume. Cannabis has all of the essential amino acids we need, making juicing it a super nutritious option.

Juicing cannabis provides an excellent method of medicinal consumption of the healing cannabinoids present in cannabis. You can get these healing benefits from smoking cannabis, but this will also decarboxalyze the THC, inducing a psychoactive effect. While this may be beneficial for some, the non-psychoactive relief provided by the digestive absorption of cannabis juice may be more desirable for other folks. To put this in different terms, taking a hit of cannabis is comparable to taking a shot of medicine. Juicing cannabis is like drinking the bottle.

While drinking raw cannabis straight may not be so tasty, adding fruits and vegetables such as carrots, ginger and pomegranate can help out a lot with the flavor. Any fruit or vegetable juicer works for the process, but we recommend using a wheat-grass juicer for best results. Cannabis juice is best ingested fresh, in order to provide all of the medicinal benefits to patients. This means that juicing are best when they are homemade and 110% fresh.

juicing cannabis
So fresh.

Not only does juicing provide patients with non-psychoactive relief, but it also encourages us to use the entire plant and avoid being wasteful. Besides, the parts of the cannabis plant generally considered to be without use, such as the leaves and stems, can have their own medicinal benefit that we may not be completely aware of yet. Not only does cannabis juice provide medicinal patients with significant relief, but it also acts as a wonderful nutritional and healthy food option for many folks.

Cannabis and Cancer

People with cancer who must undergo radiation and chemotherapy frequently stop treatments rather than suffer the nausea, pain, and other unpleasant side effects. Years before any state had authorized the medical use of cannabis, a 1991 Harvard Medical School study revealed that nearly half (44%) of U.S. oncologists were recommending cannabis to their patients as a way of mitigating the side effects of cancer treatments.

In its 1999 review, the Institute of Medicine concluded that cannabis could be a valid alternative for many people living with cancer. Specifically, the IOM notes, “In patients already experiencing severe nausea or vomiting, pills are generally ineffective, because of the difficulty in swallowing or keeping a pill down, and slow onset of the drug effect.”

Cannabis and Cancer

Since the release of the IOM report, new research has been published which supports the use of cannabis to curb the debilitating effects of cancer treatment. In 2001, a review of clinical studies conducted in several states during the past two decades revealed that, in 768 individuals with cancer, cannabis was a highly effective anti-emetic in chemotherapy. Other studies have concluded that the active components in cannabis produce palliative effects in cancer patients by preventing nausea, vomiting and pain and by stimulating appetite.

The tumor-fighting properties of cannabinoids have also been demonstrated in numerous laboratory studies, though not yet in human clinical trials. Researchers have observed that “these compounds have been shown to inhibit the growth of tumor cells in culture and animal models by modulating key cell-signaling pathways. Cannabinoids are usually well tolerated, and do not produce the generalized toxic effects of conventional chemotherapies.”

The Therapeutic Potential of Cannabis

While research in the United States has been sharply restricted by the federal prohibition on cannabis in the past, recent discoveries have increased interest among scientists in the more than 100 different cannabinoids so far identified in the cannabis plant. The International Cannabinoid Research Society (ICRS) was formally incorporated as a scientific research organization in 1991, and since its incorporation the membership has more than tripled. The International Association for Cannabis as Medicine (IACM), founded in 2000, publishes a bi-weekly newsletter and holds a bi-annual symposium to highlight emerging clinical research concerning cannabis therapeutics. The University of California established the Center for Medical Cannabis Research (CMCR) in 2001 to conduct scientific studies to ascertain the general medical safety and efficacy of cannabis products and examine alternative forms of cannabis administration. In 2010, the CMCR issued a report on the 14 clinical studies it has conducted, most of which were FDA-approved, double-blind, placebo-controlled clinical studies that have demonstrated that cannabis can control pain, in some cases better than the available alternatives.

To date, more than 15,000 modern peer-reviewed scientific articles on the chemistry and pharmacology of cannabis and cannabinoids have been published, as well as more than 2,000 articles on the body’s natural endocannabinoids. In recent years, more placebo-controlled human trials have also been conducted.

A 2009 review of clinical studies conducted over a 38-year period, found that “nearly all of the 33 published controlled clinical trials conducted in the United States have shown significant and measurable benefits in subjects receiving the treatment.” The review’s authors note that cannabinoids have the capacity for analgesia through neuromodulation in ascending and descending pain pathways, neuroprotection, and anti-inflammatory mechanisms—all of which indicates that the cannabinoids found in cannabis have applications in managing chronic pain, muscle spasticity, cachexia, and other debilitating conditions.

Currently, cannabis is most often recommended as complementary or adjunct medicine. But there is a substantial consensus among experts in the relevant disciplines, including the American College of Physicians, that cannabis and cannabis-based medicines have therapeutic properties that could potentially treat a variety of serious and chronic illness.