Topicals

Cannabis Topicals and Dermatology

Cannabis topicals are good for a variety of ailments. Some of the salves that we currently have in stock help treat symptoms related to psoriasis, melanoma, arthritis, migraines and symptoms like dry and itchy skin. Cannabis topicals come in several varieties, such as roll-on oils, nourishing salves and ointments, and in some cases even products such as soap and sprays.

Topicals are applied directly to the skin, where they are absorbed and utilized by the body. Even though the cannabinoids are being effectually used in the healing process, cannabis topicals are non-psychoactive as long as they are not orally ingested… which is not a course of action that we recommend. It is also important to avoid using cannabis topicals on new, open and bleeding wounds. They can certainly help your body heal cuts and bruises after they have closed up, however.

The anti-inflammatory properties present in a multitude of cannabinoids are remarkable; cannabis topicals are therefore very helpful for folks recovering from injuries and for people who suffer from ailments such as rheumatoid arthritis and lupus. Topicals help reduce the time it takes to heal from injuries, and promote the functionality of joints and reduce nodule formation.

Cannabis topicals essentially combine the effects of antibiotic ointment with the healing effects of a salve to produce lovely products that can even help heal burns, eczema, rashes, fungus, and annoyances like warts and blemishes. The uses of topicals are still being explored, but the overwhelming amount of anecdotal evidence of their efficacy in treating all of the ailments we have listed, and more, is undeniable.

Some healing or relieving effects of topicals

  • anti-inflammatory effects
  • analgesic effects
  • relaxing effects on muscles and other body tissues
  • muciparous decongesting effects
  • regenerative effects on body tissues

There are so many conditions that cannabis topicals can help with, and they might just be able to help you too. Stop by the shop and browse our wide selection of topical salves, balms, sprays, and oils to find something that works for you.

 

Cooking with Cannabis – Pot Pizza

Pot… and pizza?! I’m not sure I can think of a better combination. This is it, guys. It’s all downhill from here. Until you eat the pot pizza, that is…

Ingredients

  • 1 prepared pizza dough (I recommend getting pizza dough from local shops – for example, Pizza Mondo here in Bend sells their dough and it is awesome).
  • 1 cup Cannabis Pizza Sauce
  • 1/2 cup mozzarella cheese, shredded
  • 1/2 cup romano cheese, shredded
  • additional toppings as desired

Directions

  1. Prepare pizza dough in whatever way you prefer (oven, BBQ, etc.) If you are using an oven, preheating it to 400 degrees is the norm. Insider tip: When you’re preparing your dough, roll string cheese sticks into the outer edge to create your very own stuffed crust pizza! It’s outrageously delicious, especially if you warm the cheese sticks up a bit before you cook the dough to ensure they melt adequately.
  2. Spread Cannabis Pizza Sauce evenly on top of dough.
  3. Sprinkle cheese evenly on top of sauce.
  4. Add extra toppings as desired.
  5. Bake in oven for 18 to 25 minutes, or as desired, until cheese is golden brown.

For more delicious recipes like this one, visit the Stoner’s Cookbook right here.

 

Cannabinoid Breakdown

The Cannabis plant and its products consist of an enormous variety of chemicals, including over 100 unique cannabinoids. While some are more well known than others, each has an important part to play in the healing process. Here’s a handy guide highlighting some of the most notable properties of these remarkable cannabinoids.


Compound: Cannabigerolic Acid

Abbreviation: CBGA

Pharmacological Characteristics: Antibiotic


Compound: Cannabigerol 

Abbreviation: CBG 

Pharmacological Characteristics: Antibiotic, Antifungal, Anti-inflammatory, Analgesic, GABA uptake inhibitor, reduces keratinocytes proliferation in psoriasis, effective against MRSA. 


Compound: Cannabichromene

Abbreviation: CBC

Pharmacological Characteristics: Antibiotic, Antifungal, Anti-inflammatory, Analgesic (weak) 


Compound: Cannabidiolic Acid

Abbreviation: CBDA

Pharmacological Characteristics: Antibiotic


Compound: Cannabidiol

Abbreviation: CBD

Pharmacological Characteristics: Anxiolytic, Antipsychotic, Analgesic, Anti-inflammatory, Antioxidant, Antispasmodic, Anti-emetic, Antifungal, Anti-convulsant, Antidepressant, Antagonizes the effects of THC, decreases sebum/sebocytes proliferation, effective against methicillin-resistant staphylococcus aureus, pro-apoptotic against breast cancer cell lines.


Compound: Cannabinol

Abbreviation: CBN

Pharmacological Characteristics: Sedative, Antibiotic, Anti-convulsant, Anti-inflammatory, decreases breast cancer resistant protein, effective against MRSA.


Compound: Delta-9 Tetrahydrocannabinol

Abbreviation: THC

Pharmacological Characteristics: Euphoriant, Analgesic, Anti-inflammatory, Antioxidant, Antiemetic, Antipruritic, Bronchodilator. 


Compound: Delta-9 Tetrahydrocannabivarin

Abbreviation: THCV

Pharmacological Characteristics: Analgesic, Euphoriant, Anti-convulsant in vitro. 


The human body produces endocannabinoids, its own natural version of cannabinoids. Cannabinoid receptors are found throughout the body, especially in the nervous and immune systems. The endocannabinoid system is involved in a variety of physiological processes including appetite, pain-sensation, sleep, mood and memory. Endocannabinoids and cannabinoid receptors respond to biological events—for example, endocannabinoid levels will rise in response to brain injury, strokes, nerve injuries and associated pain. Both plant cannabinoids and endocannabinoids bind to the body’s cannabinoid receptors. When this binding occurs, effects such as pain relief and the suppression of stress result.

Sativa

Sativa strains of cannabis, similar to their Indica cousins, have a wide variety of health benefits. Some of the more notable benefits include

  • Relief from depression
  • Mind stimulation
  • Increasing focus, and
  • Treating PTSD

Examples: Cinex, Haze Wreck, Jack Herer


Sativa plants are found throughout the world. Potent varieties such as Colombian, Panamanian, Mexican, Nigerian, Congolese, Indian and Thai are found in equatorial and sub/equatorial zones. These plants require a long time to mature because they originated in areas that have a long season. They are usually very potent, containing large quantities of THC. The highs they produce are described in such terms as psychedelic, dreamy, spacey, and creative. The buds usually smell sweet or tangy and the smoke is smooth, sometimes deceptively so.

Sativa plants grow in a conical, Christmas-tree form. The leaves have long, narrow serrated blades, wide spacing between branches, and vigorous growth. They often grow very tall outdoors and are difficult to control indoors.

Sativas have long, medium-thick buds when grown in full equatorial sun; under artificial light with inadequate intensity, or even under the temperate sun, the buds run, or are thinner, longer and don’t fill out completely. In areas with short growing seasons, the buds often don’t mature before frost.


Sativa at a Glance

Height: 5′ to 25′ (1.5 to 7.5 m)

Shape: Tall, Christmas-tree shape

Branching: Moderate branching, wide at its base, single stem at top

Nodes: Long stem length between leaves

Leaves: Long leaves, thin long blades

Color: Pale to medium green

Flowers: Long sausage-shaped flowers

Odor: Sweet to spicy

High: Psychedelic

Flowering: 8 to 15 weeks