Substance Market Dab Reviews

Dab Review: Chem Dawg and Dutch Treat Rosin

Sterling Gold’s Rosin is the first Flower Rosins (SHO) I’ve personally had the pleasure of trying, and they were delightful!

I’ll admit, I was one of the skeptics in the group about people using hair straighteners for science. But now with the industrial presses we are seeing around, I see the light!

The looks of these two really speak for themselves, and the smell matches the flowers amazingly! That was my first big surprise with this rosin, the smell literally smacks you across the face.

The consistency of both were very manageable. I would even say you could use your hands, but I was pulling and snapping with my dab tool.

The second surprise with these Rosins was the flavor. Simply put, it’s delicious! Reminds me of fresh “greens” from some sweet chronic back in the day. I think we all remember our first, fresh delicious “greens” rip?

Along with amazing flavor, these rips were super smooth. Easy to puff tough and not kill yourself. Even higher temp nail rips weren’t bad, so that’s a real win in my book.

Experience, well let’s just say it took me 2 weeks to finish this review 😉

-Steve Hubbard

Get Involved in Marijuana Legislation

It’s an exciting time in Central Oregon!

Please show your support for allowing recreational marijuana businesses in Deschutes County by attending one of these local meetings. These meetings are open to the public.  Attendees are expected to be professional and respectful in behavior and appearance.

Public Hearings on Marijuana Land Use Regulations:

Wednesday Dec 2nd

1:30pm – Deschutes County Commission (1300 NW Wall St. in Bend)

6:00pm – Deschutes County Commission (1300 NW Wall St. in Bend)

7:00pm – City of Bend (710 Wall St. in Bend)

Come to a hearing and see what’s up with the recreational marijuana legislation in Deschutes County.

What’s it Like to Work in a Weed Store?

Working in a pot shop is not exactly “high” times, like some may expect.  Unfortunately, we can’t sit around all day taking bong hits and eating marshmallows. (If anyone knows where I can get paid to do that, please let me know!) This is a job, after all, and we are professionals. Despite the rules and regulations that we must follow like any other business in the state, however, we are free to be who we are and to have a good time.

My fellow employees are a fantastic group of people.  We cover a broad spectrum of ages, origins, and marijuana experiences.  Some of us are wives and mothers while others are barely out of high school.  Some of us are old school and like taking bong rips while others are dabbers and others prefer edibles.  Our varied perspectives bring something extra special to the Bloomwell community.

Is anyone wondering how I explain my job to other people? There’s not much explaining to do.  I tell people that I work in a marijuana dispensary.  My kid knows where I work and what is going on here, my parents know what I do, my friends know what I do… There’s no reason to hide in the closet because I’m not doing anything wrong.  If anything, working at a weed store has given me an outstanding opportunity to talk about cannabis with others and to dispel myths about what’s legal and what isn’t.

One of the best parts of this business is that I have a front-row seat to cannabis legalization and that’s really exciting. I love meeting interesting people from all over the world and from all walks of life who like using marijuana for whatever reason.  Cannabis is the plant that brings people together.

Recreational Marijuana: It’s the marijuana you DO take home to mom.  

I mean, only take weed home to your mom if she’s into that sort of thing.

Well, it finally happened.  The seventh seal was broken, the words were spoken, and that one-time innocuous weed that the devil planted so long ago was finally let loose onto the public last month.  Oh, the horror, the horror.  Release the Ganja!  The Sticky Icky!

Seriously, though.  It’s all a bit silly now, isn’t it?  Of course, those dangerous and dirty pot heads who’ve been ignoring those ridiculous prohibition laws this whole time knew that the overblown War on Drugs was, and still is, nonsense.  Thankfully, sanity has started to take a more active role in our little ole US of A–even if it is only one state at a time.

For the old stoners and the virgin recreational marijuana users — we like to say “adult consumers” around here— let’s forgo all the data and science and research regarding the medical benefits of cannabis, forget about politics, and let’s just share our marijuana experiences with our fellow humans.

Here at Substance, we aren’t about selling you a product to put money in our pocket; we’re about sharing our knowledge and experiences.  We want you to have a good time.  Come in today and see what we have to offer.  Come back tomorrow.  Tell your friends about us.  Tell us what you like and try a new strain.  Just walk in and buy yourself some pot – really good pot – and finally enjoy it without being paranoid about the fuzz.

What do you like to do after a bowl (or two)?

Heck Yeah, We Do Sell Recreational Marijuana Here!

Gone are the days of, “Pssst! Hey, do you know where we can score some pot?” It is now legal for participating Oregon Medical Marijuana Dispensaries to sell marijuana to adults who are 21 or over.

That’s right, folks, you can all (21 and over) come in to Substance and buy marijuana from us, legally. For real.  No code words or secret handshakes are necessary. You know what makes us extra awesome? We accept credit and debit cards, so you don’t even need to drive by the ATM first.

Oregon Recreational Marijuana law states that we may sell up to 7 grams – 1/4 ounce – of flower per day to someone who is at least 21 years old.  We also have seed packets available and a list of clones that are available to pre-order.

Due to the high demand of our client base, we rotate through a variety of marijuana flowers –buds – and our selection is always changing.  Flower is packaged in 1 gram, 3.5 gram, and 7 gram bags and we have a wide selection of pre-rolled joints available.  We also carry a selection of pipes, grinders, lighters, and other non-medicated items.

Oregon Medical Marijuana Program (OMMP) cardholders have their own sales island and are allowed to purchase all of our flower products as well as our tinctures, edibles, concentrates, oils, candy and beverages.  Unfortunately, those products will not be available for the recreational users until the end of 2016 due to pending legislation.  We highly recommend you obtain your medical card to have access to all of our delicious products.

Please be respectful and don’t spark it up in our parking lot.

Recreational or Adult Use, Marijuana or Cannabis: Which Term to Use?

If you’ve ever been to a dispensary, you might have noticed some slightly different language to refer to the products and services inside than you have heard colloquially or in the popular media. In this post, we give a brief breakdown of why we use the language that we do.

Recreational vs. Adult Use

With legalization in Colorado and Washington, and now in Oregon as well, you’ve probably heard the term “recreational marijuana” to refer to cannabis use outside of medical marijuana programs. Here at Substance, we refer to cannabis usage for adults over the age of 21 who do not hold Oregon Medical Marijuana Program (OMMP) cards as “adult use”.

We use this term because we believe that responsible adults can and should be able to determine what cannabis usage means to them. The medical vs. recreational binary creates a false choice for cannabis users, reinforcing the idea that non-medical users of cannabis are making inherently risky or reckless decisions. Sensible, adult cannabis users who do not have qualifying conditions for the Oregon Medical Marijuana Program should face no more stigma than adult users of alcohol. Adult beer drinkers, by comparison, do not have to go to the ‘recreational beer store’.

Cannabis vs. Marijuana

Cannabis and marijuana essentially refer to the same thing. Technically, cannabis refers to the parent plant, which can be broken up into Cannabis sativa, Cannabis indica, and Cannabis ruderalis. Sativas and indicas are what we seek on the medical and adult use markets – ruderalis lacks the cannabinoids that provide those sought-after therapeutic benefits. Hemp is used to refer to a low-THC variety of Cannabis sativa that is often harvested for industrial use.

Marijuana is generally used to refer to higher THC (or CBD) varieties of Cannabis sativa and Cannabis indica. However, the term has not always been so commonplace. Widespread usage of the word ‘marijuana’ began following the Mexican Revolution of 1910, when the United States saw a large influx of Mexican migrants. Many of these migrants used cannabis as a medicine and a relaxant, and as anti-Mexican sentiment went on the rise, racist propaganda spread fear of the Mexican “Marijuana Menace”.

Because of the history of racism associated with the term ‘marijuana’ in the United States, and the general applicability of the term ‘cannabis’, we use the latter. Considering this history, and the stigmas still surrounding cannabis use today, we feel that using the term ‘adult cannabis use’ over ‘recreational marijuana’ helps combat the negative associations that we as a society have with the cannabis plant.

We hope this post has been informative. Thanks for reading, and we look forward to seeing even more of you join our community of adult cannabis users come October 1st!

Cannabis and the Hemp Industry

Hemp, a low-THC variety of Cannabis sativa, has long had a wide variety of industrial uses. With uses ranging from paper to plastic substitutes to cooking oil, hemp is among the most versatile crops produced.

The Historical Context

Hemp has a long history in the United States. The crop was first planted in Jamestown, Virginia in the early 17th century. In World War II, the U.S. government even launched a massive “Hemp for Victory” campaign, encouraging farmers to grow as much of the plant as possible.

Attacks on cannabis, beginning in the early 20th century, soon ceased to differentiate between hemp and marijuana. Some believe hemp was intentionally targeted by William Randolf Hearst because it threatened his interest in the newspaper industry, although this history is disputed. With the passage of the Controlled Substances Act in 1970, hemp was made illegal to grow without a special permit by the Drug Enforcement Agency (DEA). Permits have been extraordinarily hard to come by since the law’s passage.

Hemp and Legalization Today

As legalization of cannabis progresses across the United States, efforts to reinvest in hemp are abound. The passage of the 2014 Farm Bill allowed for hemp to be grown for agricultural or academic research. Colorado’s pilot program has taken off, and Oregon’s Department of Agriculture established its own pilot program in February of this year.

Unlike its Coloradan counterpart, the Oregon program has been off to a rough start. Earlier this year, medical marijuana growers in southern Oregon raised concerns over hemp cultivation, citing fears that cross-pollination may weaken the quality of their crop. They want hemp farmers to grow their crops in eastern Oregon, where they hope the Cascades will act as a natural barrier against rogue hemp pollen.

However, the three most disputed counties – Josephine, Jackson, and Douglas – have some of the best conditions for outdoor crop cultivation in Oregon. Warm average temperatures and plenty of precipitation make for long outdoor growing seasons. Eastern Oregon, by contrast, is considerably drier with colder average temperatures. Researchers believe, however, that hemp requires less water than other varieties of the cannabis crop.

For now, Oregon’s industrial hemp program is on halt. The Department of Agriculture recently announced that it would temporarily stop issuing licenses for industrial hemp. Officials say that the decision is unrelated to marijuana growers’ concerns, but rather is due to a range of complex policy issues. Regardless, the road ahead appears to be a challenging one for cultivators and policymakers alike.

Recreational Cannabis Stores in Bend, Oregon

Everybody knows that Measure 91 makes the recreational use of cannabis legal in Oregon as of July 1st, but what does that really mean? It means that adults 21+ can have it, but they can’t buy it in a store just yet. Here is some information about adult cannabis possession and consumption — we refer to it as adult or recreational use. Let’s educate ourselves and, while we’re at it, share this information about responsible adult 21+ cannabis use.

Who can have it?

Adults who are at least 21 years old can possess and consume cannabis as of July 1st, 2015.  Users may not provide cannabis to anyone under the age of 21, not even in their own home.

How much can they have?

At home, cannabis users may possess a maximum of 8 ounces (227 grams) of dried cannabis flowers — bud. There may also be up to four plants grown per residence, but the plants must be grown out of public view. Outside of their home, but still out of public view, users may have up to one ounce of dried cannabis flowers in their possession.

Where can cannabis be consumed?

In private. Cannabis cannot legally be consumed in any public place or while driving.  Remember, it is always illegal, not to mention dangerous, to drive a vehicle while under the influence of intoxicants. Consider keeping cannabis in your trunk or other locking compartment to prevent hassles.

Where can they get it?

Medical dispensaries are not yet able to sell cannabis to everyone; only cannabis sales to OMMP cardholders are permitted. It is, however, legal for an OMMP patient to share their medical cannabis with their adult 21+ friends. Thanks to the passage of SB 460, dispensaries will be able to begin limited sales to adults over the age of 21 starting October 1st. Dispensaries will be able to sell up to 1/4 ounce of bud a day, as well as seeds and up to four clones, or starter plants.

However, SB 460 does not allow dispensaries to sell any other cannabis-infused products. That means no topicals, tinctures, edibles, or concentrates. The OLCC hopes to open adult-use stores with these products in the second half of 2016. Additionally, the adult use market will be taxed at 25% come January 2016. You can avoid the tax and gain access to a wider range of therapeutic products by keeping your OMMP cards current or applying for your card today.

Strain Review – Chem Dawg

Chem Dawg (sometimes Chemdawg) has secured quite the name for itself over the years. A series of successful crosses of this strain to make such powerful strains as Sour Diesel and OG Kush has made Chem Dawg a favorite amongst growers and consumers alike. Its potency is well known, being largely THC dominant, with strong traces of powerful terpenes to ensure its medicinal efficacy and strength, not to mention its distinctly diesel-like aroma.

Many patients enjoy using Chem Dawg to help them manage their stress, depression and anxiety, which is indicative of the strain’s heavy euphoric and heady effects. However, it is particularly effective at managing pain and painful body symptoms that can arise from a variety of conditions. When asked, many patients say that Chem Dawg is a truly exceptional strain and one whose experience they would not want to pass up.

Generally, THC levels of Chem Dawg average around 20%. That being said, the particular crop that we at Substance are currently carrying tested at 25% THC. That, coupled with its strong aroma and flavorful kick, certainly ensures that this is one of the best Chem Dawg crops in Central Oregon. Its potency may be a concern for some folks new to cannabis, but if that is the case, there are options for you to help you balance the intense cerebral effects of strains like Chem Dawg while still taking advantage of their notable medicinal applications. For example, you could pick up a CBD-intensive edible to help balance the cannabis experience.

Stop by Substance Medical Marijuana Dispensary soon and speak with our staff about THC, CBD, edibles, and strains like Chem Dawg to find out what will work best for you.

For prices and availability, visit our Online Menu. 

Blue Magoo

Strain Review – Blue Magoo

Blue Magoo, not to be confused with Blue Goo, is a lovely indica dominant hybrid strain with a rich lineage stretching back to the mid 90s where it was originally cultivated by one of the many great growers of Oregon. The mother of the strain was the ever popular indica Blueberry, which was pollinated by Major League Bud (also known as William’s Wonder F2)

A fusion of berry, fruit, and other floral notes make up the aroma and taste of Blue Magoo, resulting in a palate as colorful as its pastel purple and green buds. A tight bud structure is not uncommon in this strain, with dense and resinous nugs absolutely covered in beautiful frosty trichomes.

Blue Magoo is a favorite among patients as it combats a variety of symptoms including pain, nausea, insomnia, anxiety, and appetite loss. Many patients have claimed that Blue Magoo is a fast acting pain reliever that does not generally carry with it some of the anxiety-inducing effects that higher THC cannabis strains sometimes have. The lack of paranoid side effects, coupled with the rapid and efficacious symptoms relief and palatable fruity taste, make Blue Magoo a very approachable strain and one that any patient would be pleased to experience. 

Substance is currently carrying this strain on our shelves. It starts at $9 a gram, $31.50 an eighth, $60 a quarter, $110 a half ounce and $220 for a full 28 grams. Testing at 20.15% THC and 0.45% CBD, this flower is lovely and exceptional by all accounts. Stop by and see it for yourself.


To read more about Blue Magoo, check out Leafly’s feature right here.