CBD for Pets!

Our friends at Flower Child wrote this great piece on using cannabis to treat your pets. Their CBD Tincture for Pets is available at both Substance locations. Of course, be sure to consult with a trusted veterinarian before giving medical marijuana to your pet.

Marijuana for Pets, Oh My!

Our pets mean the world to us, they fill our lives with happiness and laughter, they are loyal and never judge us, they forgive us and are always happy to see us. We love our pets. We want them to be happy and healthy and it’s awful when they are sick. It hurts us to see our pets suffering.

Cannabis has been used for thousands of years for it’s therapeutic qualities and as it becomes more and more accepted today for it’s medicinal benefits people are realizing that cannabis works wonders not only for humans but for our four legged friends as well. You got it. Medical marijuana for pets!

Some people may call the cannabis movement a trend or a craze, but this herb’s therapeutic properties are science-based fact. Oakland-based veterinarian Dr. Gary Richter tells us cannabis can be used on your pet to treat a variety of medical conditions including:

  • Allergies/ itching
  • Anxiety
  • Arthritis and other causes of pain
  • Appetite support
  • Cancer treatment
  • Cancer pain
  • Glaucoma
  • Inflammatory Bowel Disease
  • Quality of life / Hospice care
  • Seizures

But, we still have a lot to learn about cannabis in general and marijuana for pets is no different.

If you’re considering medical marijuana for pets, here are some important points you want to keep in mind.
And of course, be sure to consult with a trusted veterinarian before giving medical marijuana to your pet.

Pets have endocannabinoid systems, just like us humans

The endocannabinoid system is quickly gaining relevance in modern medicine for both humans and pets.
Just like humans, animals also have endocannabinoid systems (ECS). The ECS has receptors throughout the whole body. It is this system that helps us maintain balance in our body. If we are deficient in cannabinoids our body is out of whack so to speak. We are unbalanced.

Like us, animals produce their own cannabinoids to interact with and signal the ECS. And like us, animals also run into endocannabinoid deficiencies. This is where whole-plant-based cannabis medicine comes into play. Cannabis has cannabinoids which attach to our ECS and create balance and healing for those deficient in cannabinoids. It is almost as if this plant was created specifically to heal and balance our bodies.

Be very careful with dosing marijuana to your pet.

A marijuana overdose is not fatal, but it can be a traumatic experience as a pet owner. The general rule of thumb is this: give the smallest dose possible and gradually work your way up until you find the smallest yet most effective cannabis dosage level for your pet. But knowing exactly what dosage you’re giving your pet can be tricky, Richter says. And because many of the products on the market are highly potent and animals have a smaller body size, we have to be extra careful.

Signs of a pet marijuana overdose.

If your pet does experience a cannabis overdose, don’t let the mishap turn you away from this medicine completely. The therapeutic potential is still there if done properly. Too much THC can be extremely unpleasant, and with pets it’s really easy to overdo it if you’re not careful – or if you don’t know what you’re doing. So what does a pet overdose look like, and how do you know when to make a trip to the emergency clinic?

“A lot of it might be what you expect. The animal will start to look a little bit spacey and get a bit wobbly,” Richter says. “A lot of dogs will develop the syndrome called static ataxia, where basically they’re standing still and start to tip over but catch themselves before they fall.”

If the overdose is substantial enough, the pet’s blood pressure level may not be particularly stable or they won’t eat, Richter says. Even though these overdoses are not fatal they can be an extremely traumatic – not to mention pricey – experience for pets and families. Nobody wants to see their pet in that kind of condition. And the thing with edibles is that the effects can be really long-lasting, 12 hours or longer depending on how much has been consumed. It’s an experience that can turn pet owners away from marijuana for pets completely, even though there is still therapeutic potential if done properly. New research is showing that CBD can counteract the affects of a THC overdose, kind of an antidote.

Should you take your pet to the emergency clinic?

“If the dog is a little wobbly but seems comfortable, I would not necessarily advise a visit to the emergency room. If you are concerned however, it’s best to contact a veterinarian for advice,” Richter says. “If the pet is having a hard time standing and they’re not really responding properly and they’re not eating or drinking, then they probably need to be seen for that.”

Learn the methods of marijuana delivery for your pet.

Deciding which delivery method is best for your pet can take some research. Capsules, treats, tinctures, topicals – just like cannabis medicine for humans, we have a variety of options in delivering marijuana for pets. Richter has seen a lot of pet owners find success with cannabis oils, which they give their pet orally. He has also seen a cannabis topical spray clear up severe skin allergies in dogs, to the point where they stop scratching for 4 to 6 hours.

“Short of loading them up on a steroid like prednisone, nothing does that. This topical is nothing short of amazing,” Richter says.

Yet another method of delivery, although Richter has yet to see it applied to pets, is a cannabis suppository.

Figuring out THC-CBD ratios for pets.

With cannabis there are countless options to form the ultimate combination of strains, cannabinoids, and terpenes. This is an important part of cannabis medicine, especially because the amount of THC, CBD, and other cannabinoids, flavonoids, and terpenes can fluctuate wildly from one strain to another. Dr. Richter has seen success with varying ratios of THC and CBD depending on the condition being treated.

“Sometimes, higher concentrations of THC are more effective provided the product is dosed correctly,” he says. Finding the best ratio of marijuana for pets requires experimenting, trial and error – and of course safe access to products that are accurately and precisely labeled.

“It is always best to seek the advice of an experienced veterinary professional when deciding which product and what dose to use,” Richter says. Richter advises against CBD products where there is little to no THC – such as with a lot of the CBD hemp oils found online. “If you’re looking to treat a dog that maybe has minor soreness, there might be some positive effect with a hemp-based CBD product, but otherwise you’re severely restricting your therapeutic applications,” he says.

“With higher-end therapy for things like cancer, autoimmune disease, seizures, or even severe pain, you want a product that is made from cannabis – not hemp – that has a certain amount of THC in it.” The difference without THC in the mix, Richter says, is like the difference between shooting a bullet and throwing it.

Talk to your veterinarian about marijuana for pets.

Whether you live in a prohibition state or not, it’s okay to talk to your vet about marijuana for pets. The conversation has to start somewhere, and even if your veterinarian knows next to nothing about cannabis – that’ll change if enough people start asking.

“As cannabis becomes more available, you’re going to see people out there who will want to use it with their pets,” Richter says. “It’s going to be really important that somebody is able to provide people with guidance. There’s an opportunity here for education.”

If you are interested in using marijuana for pets, Flower Child recommends…

At FlowerChild CBD we recommend our CBD Tincture for Pets. This tincture has been specially formulated for animals with a very high CBD to THC ratio 25:1. It is a medicinal cannabis CBD not a industrial hemp CBD!

THC is what gets you high. CBD does not. THC is necessary in the blend to work synergistically with the CBD, but huge amounts of THC are not necessary to receive the medical benefits of the cannabis.

Help spread cannabis education by sharing this article with friends and followers. Who knows how many pets we might save.

ABOUT GARY RICHTER

Dr. Gary Richter is the owner and medical director of two award-winning veterinary hospitals in Oakland, California. His facilities, Montclair Veterinary Hospital and Holistic Veterinary Care provide both Western and complementary medicine for patients.

Dr. Richter approaches veterinary medicine with an “eyes open” strategy. He utilizes Western medicine, complementary and alternative care, and new, emerging therapies to achieve the best possible results. By incorporating modalities such as herbal/nutritional therapy, acupuncture, chiropractic, and hyperbaric oxygen with conventional medicine and surgery, Dr. Richter does more than treat disease – he promotes healing and wellness.

“There are many conditions that can only be treated with Western medicine and surgery,” says Dr. Richter. “But clearly Western medicine is not the solution to every problem. It would be a mistake for us to turn our backs on successful treatment options because they are not mainstream or widely accepted. There are many occasions when alternative therapy or a combination of therapies is the best solution. If optimal health and welfare is the goal, every legitimate option should be considered for every patient.”
Article by Green Flower Media – Gregory Frye

Distillate: The cannabis concentrate of the future

distillation | dis·til·la·tion | noun

a: the purification or concentration of a substance, the obtaining of the essence or volatile properties contained in it, or the separation of one substance from another, by such a process.

You may only remember this word from high school chemistry class, but distillation is quickly changing the cannabis industry. Concentrate producers are using innovative distillation techniques to create potent, pure, and clean cannabis distillates that can be dabbed, vaped, eaten, dropped under your tongue… the list goes on.

Where Does A Cannabis Oil Distillate Come From?

Pure, potent cannabis oil distillate does not just appear in the wild. There is a specific scientific process that takes place before users are presented with what may very well be the future of cannabis concentrates. In order to extract THC, terpenes, and other cannabinoids from the cannabis plant a solvent-based (butane, propane, CO2) extraction must be performed first.

The solvent-based extraction removes valuable compounds from the plant itself, however many other compounds remain in the extract. In order to distill down to a more pure form, further refinement is done through the processes of winterization and decarboxylation. Finally, the oil is run through a distillation chamber multiple times to refine the desirable compound (THC or CBD) to its most pure form.

Consuming Cannabis Oil Distillate

As we mentioned above, cannabis distillates have a wide variety of applications that can appeal to just about any type of user. Pure cannabis distillates contain virtually no flavors or aromas, which makes them perfect for practical applications where the cannabis “flavor” is not needed or wanted (think edibles and drinks!). Additionally, these powerful distillates have great medicinal potential because of the small amounts needed to produce strong effects.

With a potential potency of nearly 99%, cannabis oil distillate should not be taken lightly. Check out this simple graph below to get an idea of how potent distillate is compared to flower.

distillate-potency

Final Word

While cannabis distillate may be somewhat new to the concentrate market, this well-developed, scientific extraction technique looks to be the next gold standard for cannabis extraction and refinement. While we still love our BHO, CO2, and PHO dabs… cannabis oil distillate is certainly worth trying if you’re looking for the most pure, clean, and potent concentrate.

Cannabis Reactions

People often react very differently to cannabis consumption. For many, it’s a relaxing, even meditative experience, while others often feel anxious and paranoid. Some find a small, light dosage effective. Others need high quantities of extremely strong cannabis to feel any effects at all. So why do our reactions vary so widely? Today, we’ll explore a few fundamental components of our reactions to cannabis consumption.

The Endocannabinoid System

Our bodies process the cannabis plant through the endocannabinoid system. This system helps us maintain homeostasis. It works by producing endocannabinoids, natural chemicals that help our bodies with bioregulation. Endocannabinoids and the endocannabinoid system play a crucial role in regulating a variety of biological functions, including our reaction to chronic stress, nervous system functions, and even our body’s response to cancer.

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Image Source: http://www.cell.com/trends/endocrinology-metabolism/fulltext/S1043-2760(15)00140-X

Cannabinoids are chemicals naturally secreted by the cannabis plant. They mirror the endocannabinoids produced by our body, and interact with the endocannabinoid system in a similar manner. These interactions help cause the plant’s psychoactive effects and therapeutic effects.

THC vs CBD

One of the most well known cannabinoids is tetrahydrocannabinol, or THC. This cannabinoid is primarily responsible for the high we associate with the cannabis plant. It also stimulates appetite, can reduce muscle spasms and vomiting, and relieves pain.  For some, THC can cause anxiety. Understanding your sensitivity to THC can help you better regulate the psychological effects you experience, and help you deal with any feelings of anxiety or paranoia.

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Image Source: http://www.weedist.com/2014/07/kick-paranoia-enjoy-cannabis-high/

You may also be familiar with cannabidiol, or CBD. Unlike THC, cannabidiol does not cause any psychoactive effects. It does, however, produce a wide variety of therapeutic benefits. Early research shows that it may be effective in treating several particularly difficult diseases, including multiple sclerosis, post traumatic stress disorder, and Crohn’s disease. It can also reduce anxiety, and may strengthen the painkilling effects of THC.

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Image Source: http://theleafonline.com/c/science/2014/08/cannabinoid-profiles-crash-course-cbga/

While THC and CBD are naturally found in the highest relative quantities of all the cannabinoids, it’s important to remember that there are over 100 different cannabinoids, and they all have different effects. Cannabinol, or CBN, for example, can induce sleep and help relieve pain. Additionally, because everyone has a different endocannabinoid system, different consumers experience some effects more strongly than others.

Other Factors

Cannabinoids are not the only factor at work in our reactions to cannabis. The essential oils of the cannabis plant, called terpenes, can alter the kind of psychoactive effects experienced, as well as what therapeutic benefits result.

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Image Source: https://www.leafly.com/news/cannabis-101/infographic-what-are-cannabis-terpenes-and-how-do-they-affect-you

Psychological factors are also important. How comfortable you feel with your environment, your mood while consuming cannabis, and what you expect to feel can alter the intensity of psychological effects and whether or not you experience anxiety. Gender may also be a factor — recent research indicates that women may be more sensitive to THC than men. As we explored today, we all experience cannabis differently. So take your time, and find out what works for you.

 

 

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Know Your Type: Cannabis Classifications

If you’re familiar with cannabis basics, you may have heard of two common terms used to describe different types of weed: indicas and sativas. These terms refer to two different species of marijuana, cannabis indica and cannabis sativa. Indicas and sativas look, smell, and taste different. Indicas tend to grow shorter and stockier, while sativas grow taller and thinner. Indica bud may have a purplish appearance.

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More fundamentally, these differences refer to the plant’s easily observable traits, or its phenotype. While they do correlate with certain effects — indicas are known for their stoney body highs, sativas for their more cerebral high — we’ll have to dig deeper to get a better understanding of what lies behind the many psychoactive effects and therapeutic benefits of the cannabis plant.

Phenotypes, Genotypes, and Chemotypes

We mentioned that a cannabis plant’s phenotype — its easily observable traits — tends to correlate with certain effects. But correlation doesn’t imply causation, so what causes those pleasing, therapeutic benefits that we associate with marijuana? To get a better understanding of what some of those causes may be, we’ll have to explore two additional terms: genotype and chemotype.

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A genotype is a living being’s genetic makeup. While phenotype refers to external, observable traits, genotype refers to the genetic, internal blueprint that a being inherits from its parents and ancestors. A genotype outlines the set of possible characteristics that a being could have or pass on to its offspring.

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Image Source: http://www.honest-essential-oils.com/eobbd-essential-oils/botanical-definition/

While a plant’s genotype refers to its genetic makeup, its chemotype refers to its chemical makeup. That is, what chemical compounds are most prevalent and in what combinations.

Cannabis Types

As noted above, indica and sativa refer to different phenotypes of the cannabis plant. More accurately, they refer to different phenotypic expressions. The plant’s genotype is what outlines the possibilities of what it can taste, smell, look, and feel like, and its phenotype is what actually shows up. That means that even if a plant has a strongly indica-like appearance and smell, it may still be storing some sativa genetics, or vice versa. This can lead to unexpected effects. With the ever-expanding range of hybrid strains out there, mixed genetics are also becoming more and more common, and mixed effects along with them.

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Image source: http://www.bestfriendsamsterdam.com/wp-content/uploads/indica_vs_sativa.png

Chemotypes in cannabis refer specifically to its THC versus its CBD content. These are two of the better-known cannabinoids, one of the main “active ingredients” in cannabis. Cannabis comes in three different chemical variations, or chemotypes. Type I refers to the so-called “drug type”, meaning that its high THC to low CBD ratio induces psychoactive effects, as well as other therapeutic benefits. Type III refers to the “fiber” or “non-drug type”, also often called hemp, because its high CBD to low THC ratio means that it induces little-to-no psychoactive effects, although it can still offer many therapeutic benefits. Type II is a sort of intermediate.

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A hemp field. Photo credit: Barbetorte – Own work, CC BY-SA 3.0, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=7558724

While these basic chemotypes are helpful for understanding some of the effects a particular strain may have, it is important to remember that there are at least 85 different cannabinoids in the cannabis plant, and that they produce different therapeutic benefits. Cannabinoids are not the only factor at work, either. Terpenes, the essential oils of the cannabis plant that give it particular smells, also play an important role in cannabis’ psychoactive effects and therapeutic benefits.

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Image source: https://s3.amazonaws.com/leafly/content/cannabinoids-101-what-makes-cannabis-medicine/PLUe6NdETsirqg7Y9Hkf_Cannabinoid-Wheel-(Final)—English.jpg

We hope this breakdown has helped you understand what you’re getting with any one strain, and will help you find what works for you.

Heck Yeah, We Do Sell Recreational Marijuana Here!

Gone are the days of, “Pssst! Hey, do you know where we can score some pot?” It is now legal for participating Oregon Medical Marijuana Dispensaries to sell marijuana to adults who are 21 or over.

That’s right, folks, you can all (21 and over) come in to Substance and buy marijuana from us, legally. For real.  No code words or secret handshakes are necessary. You know what makes us extra awesome? We accept credit and debit cards, so you don’t even need to drive by the ATM first.

Violet-Delight--SoFresh-Farms_3
Photo by Steve Hubbard

Oregon Recreational Marijuana law states that we may sell up to 7 grams – 1/4 ounce – of flower per day to someone who is at least 21 years old.  We also have seed packets available and a list of clones that are available to pre-order.

Due to the high demand of our client base, we rotate through a variety of marijuana flowers –buds – and our selection is always changing.  Flower is packaged in 1 gram, 3.5 gram, and 7 gram bags and we have a wide selection of pre-rolled joints available.  We also carry a selection of pipes, grinders, lighters, and other non-medicated items.

Oregon Medical Marijuana Program (OMMP) cardholders have their own sales island and are allowed to purchase all of our flower products as well as our tinctures, edibles, concentrates, oils, candy and beverages.  Unfortunately, those products will not be available for the recreational users until the end of 2016 due to pending legislation.  We highly recommend you obtain your medical card to have access to all of our delicious products.

Photo by Steve Hubbard
Photo by Steve Hubbard

Please be respectful and don’t spark it up in our parking lot.

New Products and New People; Welcome Everyone 21 and Over

We believe that cannabis is part of everyone’s health and wellness regimen, whether they have a note from their doctor or not. So, let’s welcome all of the new cannabis consumers into our Substance community.

Additional demand from our new adult-use clients has allowed us to procure a larger variety of cannabis from more producers around the region. These new clients help to create a better experience for our OMMP clientele. We have invested in new systems, expanded our point of sale areas, and hired additional staff to better manage our operations and client engagement.

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OMMP clients: While it may sometimes appear we have a lobby full of people, rest assured your place is protected and we will be sure to expedite you to the OMMP station. Flash your green card and we’ll serve you promptly. We have created a dedicated OMMP service station, well stocked with concentrates, edibles, tinctures and topicals.  To show our gratitude, all OMMP clients will receive 10% off ALL products for the entire month of October.

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Featured Products 

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Golden Pineapple Flower | Elevate Gardens
Pineapple Kush Flower | Jurassic Farms
Pineapple Dog Star | Newcleus Nurseries
Pineapple Express CO2 Pen | Golden XTRX
Pineapple Dream BHO | Lunchbox Alchemy
Pineapple Chunk PHO | Mad Farma
Super Lemon Pineapple Ice Wax | Chronic Creations
Pineapple Robot Edible | SourBHOTZ

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Featured Flowers from MonkeyBird Farms — Naturally Fresh:

  • Sonoma Sour
  • Chem Sour
  • Romulan
  • Rocky Mountain Tangerine
  • Blue City Diesel

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New Oregon Candy Company Edibles

Oh Fudge – Solid Potency, Super Tasty and a great value at $5 each!

 

CBD Gold Label Taffies are Back!

Nicely balanced – 40mg CBD: 20mg THC (2:1 ratio) unnamed (6)

Choose from 7 tasty flavors:

  • Mixed Berry
  • Blue Cherry
  • Strawberry
  • Watermelon
  • Strawberry Orange
  • Fruit Punch
  • Blue Lemon Punch

Please come and celebrate the end of cannabis prohibition with us!

Recreational or Adult Use, Marijuana or Cannabis: Which Term to Use?

If you’ve ever been to a dispensary, you might have noticed some slightly different language to refer to the products and services inside than you have heard colloquially or in the popular media. In this post, we give a brief breakdown of why we use the language that we do.

Recreational vs. Adult Use

With legalization in Colorado and Washington, and now in Oregon as well, you’ve probably heard the term “recreational marijuana” to refer to cannabis use outside of medical marijuana programs. Here at Substance, we refer to cannabis usage for adults over the age of 21 who do not hold Oregon Medical Marijuana Program (OMMP) cards as “adult use”.

recreational cannabis/marijuana use - joint
Image Source: https://thejointblog.com/d-c-council-votes-unanimously-to-prohibit-pre-employment-drug-testing-for-cannabis-use/

We use this term because we believe that responsible adults can and should be able to determine what cannabis usage means to them. The medical vs. recreational binary creates a false choice for cannabis users, reinforcing the idea that non-medical users of cannabis are making inherently risky or reckless decisions. Sensible, adult cannabis users who do not have qualifying conditions for the Oregon Medical Marijuana Program should face no more stigma than adult users of alcohol. Adult beer drinkers, by comparison, do not have to go to the ‘recreational beer store’.

Cannabis vs. Marijuana

Cannabis and marijuana essentially refer to the same thing. Technically, cannabis refers to the parent plant, which can be broken up into Cannabis sativa, Cannabis indica, and Cannabis ruderalis. Sativas and indicas are what we seek on the medical and adult use markets – ruderalis lacks the cannabinoids that provide those sought-after therapeutic benefits. Hemp is used to refer to a low-THC variety of Cannabis sativa that is often harvested for industrial use.

illustration of the three types of the cannabis or marijuana plant - indica, sativa, ruderalis

Marijuana is generally used to refer to higher THC (or CBD) varieties of Cannabis sativa and Cannabis indica. However, the term has not always been so commonplace. Widespread usage of the word ‘marijuana’ began following the Mexican Revolution of 1910, when the United States saw a large influx of Mexican migrants. Many of these migrants used cannabis as a medicine and a relaxant, and as anti-Mexican sentiment went on the rise, racist propaganda spread fear of the Mexican “Marijuana Menace”.

Mexican marijuana menace newspaper story
Image Source: http://www.dailykos.com/story/2007/11/29/415310/-Marijuana-Mormon-Racists-Mexican-Bandidos-and-Crazy-Queen-Carlotta

Because of the history of racism associated with the term ‘marijuana’ in the United States, and the general applicability of the term ‘cannabis’, we use the latter. Considering this history, and the stigmas still surrounding cannabis use today, we feel that using the term ‘adult cannabis use’ over ‘recreational marijuana’ helps combat the negative associations that we as a society have with the cannabis plant.

We hope this post has been informative. Thanks for reading, and we look forward to seeing even more of you join our community of adult cannabis users come October 1st!

October Adult Use and Recreational Marijuana Sales

As of October 1st, 2015, Oregon’s medical marijuana dispensaries may choose to begin selling marijuana for adult (recreational) use to persons who are at least 21 years of age, under the regulation of the Oregon Health Authority (OHA).  Here are some important snippets of information to learn and share with your friends. Who can buy it?

  • Adults who are at least 21 years old (and, of course, medical marijuana cardholders)
  • A valid government issued photo ID showing name and date of birth is required.
  • Only the date of birth of the purchaser is recorded to maintain compliance with the OHA.

Where can we buy it?

  • Current OHA-licensed medical marijuana dispensaries may choose to sell to adults 21+ along with OMMP cardholders.
  • Recreational marijuana stores licensed by the OLCC will not be open for business until fall of 2016 at the earliest.
  • It is legal to purchase cannabis from a state-licensed medical marijuana dispensary.
  • Marijuana cardholders are allowed to share cannabis products with persons 21+

What can we buy?

  • Adults 21+ may purchase up to 7 grams (¼ oz) of marijuana (pot, weed, bud, flower) each day.
  • Adults may also purchase up to 4 immature marijuana plants (clones) and seeds per day.
  • Medical marijuana cardholders can still purchase all cannabis products that are available, including hash oil concentrates, edibles, tincture  and topicals.

Where can we consume it?

  • Consume marijuana on private property, presumably out of public view.
  • Marijuana cannot legally be consumed in public (your car, bars, parks, sidewalks, etc.)

Where should we keep it?

  • Don’t keep an open container of marijuana in your vehicle; keep it locked safely in your trunk.
  • Consider obtaining a lock box to keep children and pets safe.
  • Remember that marijuana bud is a perishable product so keep amounts to a minimum to ensure freshness.

Why should I renew my OMMP card?    Most medicated items — hash oil concentrates, edibles, tinctures and topicals — are only available for medical marijuana card holders.  You may be missing out on many amazing new products if you don’t renew your medical marijuana card!

OMMP Cardholders Adult (Recreational) Consumers
Possession Possession
  • 24 oz (672 grams) flower
  • 6 mature plants & 18 clones
  • 8 oz (224 grams) flower in residence
  • 4 plants per residence
  • 1 oz on person (not visible)
Max Purchase Allowed Per Day Max Purchase Allowed Per Day
Bud: 24 oz — that’s 1.5 pounds!Clones: 18 Seeds Oils & Concentrates — also up to 1.5 pounds! Edibles (hard and soft candy, taffy, chocolate, confections, caramel corn, etc.) Tinctures (alcohol or glycerin derived, with many herbs added) Topicals & Salves Beverages (ginger ale, kombucha, soda, etc.) Transdermal Patches Bud: ¼ oz (7 grams)Clones: 4 Seeds
Taxes Taxes
None (covered by medical marijuana application fee) 25% starting in January 2016

How do I get a medical marijuana card? We have copies of the OHA paperwork available in our lobby, and the State of Oregon has created detailed handbook PDF that is available to download and print.  Call Substance for the most up-to-date information and current lists of OMMP doctors. 

Strain Review – Chem Dawg

Chem Dawg (sometimes Chemdawg) has secured quite the name for itself over the years. A series of successful crosses of this strain to make such powerful strains as Sour Diesel and OG Kush has made Chem Dawg a favorite amongst growers and consumers alike. Its potency is well known, being largely THC dominant, with strong traces of powerful terpenes to ensure its medicinal efficacy and strength, not to mention its distinctly diesel-like aroma.

Many patients enjoy using Chem Dawg to help them manage their stress, depression and anxiety, which is indicative of the strain’s heavy euphoric and heady effects. However, it is particularly effective at managing pain and painful body symptoms that can arise from a variety of conditions. When asked, many patients say that Chem Dawg is a truly exceptional strain and one whose experience they would not want to pass up.

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Generally, THC levels of Chem Dawg average around 20%. That being said, the particular crop that we at Substance are currently carrying tested at 25% THC. That, coupled with its strong aroma and flavorful kick, certainly ensures that this is one of the best Chem Dawg crops in Central Oregon. Its potency may be a concern for some folks new to cannabis, but if that is the case, there are options for you to help you balance the intense cerebral effects of strains like Chem Dawg while still taking advantage of their notable medicinal applications. For example, you could pick up a CBD-intensive edible to help balance the cannabis experience.

Stop by Substance Medical Marijuana Dispensary soon and speak with our staff about THC, CBD, edibles, and strains like Chem Dawg to find out what will work best for you.

For prices and availability, visit our Online Menu. 

Cooking with Cannabis – Vegan Stir Fry

Learn how to decarboxylate your cannabis before cooking with it, if you wish to achieve the full psychoactive effect. 

This recipe uses cannabis coconut oil. For directions on making cannabis infused coconut oil, check out this guide.

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Ingredients


 

1 cub cubed pumpkin

1/2 cub cubed Japanese eggplant

1 cup trimmed green beans

1 red pepper deseeded and cubed

1 cup chopped coriander

1 lime

1 tablespoon crushed garlic

1 tablespoon crushed ginger

3 tablespoons gluten free sweet and dark soy sauce

2 tablespoons cannabis coconut oil

Hot sauce to taste

 

Directions


 

1. Steam pumpkin cubes for 4 minutes and reserve

2. Heat oil in a large wok or frying pan and add the eggplant and tofu. Fry till crisp before adding the garlic and ginger and stirring to combine

3. Add the soy sauce along with the pepper and the beans and stir fry until cooked but still crunchy. Add the pumpkin and stir to combine

4. Turn off the heat and squeeze in the juice of half the lime and most of the coriander

5. Garnish with hot sauce, remaining lime wedges and coriander

 

The most important thing to remember is that the vegetables you choose must be fresh. Serve this with some quinoa or wild rice if desired. Dose yourself safely and be sure to have a non-medicated side dish to help you fill up so you don’t eat too much. Clearly labeling leftovers and medicated items is recommended.


For more recipes like this, visit the Stoner’s Cookbook here.